How old is your pet in human years?

Perhaps you’ve noticed that your dog or cat has had red eyes for some time. 

You’re not too troubled by it, but you know it’s not normal. You’re right. But is it serious?

Many things can irritate your pet's eyes and sometimes make them watery or even lead to clear or yellowish secretions. Could it be conjunctivitis or an environmental allergy… to something like pollen, for example? If they have red eyes but no wateriness or secretions, they could just as well have dry eyes. What’s important to consider is that red eyes may be a manifestation of many conditions, including some that can lead to blindness; glaucoma, for example. Or it could be an ulcer, which, if not treated, can lead to serious complications.

According to Dr. Chantal Dinelle, veterinarian at the De la Pointe Veterinary Clinic in Montréal, cats and dogs tolerate pain better than humans… so much so that they could have an ulcer and not complain. “However, Dr. Dinelle points out, an ulcer could lead to a perforation of the cornea.”

A high tolerance for pain does not mean, however, that there is no pain. For your pet’s wellbeing, it’s better to know the cause of their red eyes by consulting your veterinarian.